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 Tricky Pub Quiz questions.

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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:53 am

ibis wrote:
And whose last words were "All is lost. Monks, monks, monks!"?

Henry VIII? felt bad about the monastical closures.

You are correct in each case, well done.

I'll give the questions with the answers below......

"I feel this time they have succeeded. I do not want them to undress me. I want you to undress me."

Trotsky

"That's very obvious."
JFK

"Born in a hotel room, and goddammit, died in one"
Eugene O'Neill

"Woe is me, I think I am becoming a god."

Vespasian

"Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."

Pancho Villa

"Let us cross over the river and sit under the shade of the trees"
Stonewall Jackson

Go on, get out! Last words are for fools who haven't said enough!"

Karl Marx

"I've had eighteen straight whiskies, I think that's the record . . ."
Dylan Thomas

"Bless you, Sister. May all your sons be bishops."

Brendan Behan

"I know you have come to kill me. Shoot, coward. You are only going to kill a man."

Che Guavara

Stonewall Jacksons words were used by Hemmingway as the title for his novel "Over the River and into the Trees".

Aparently the last words of General Sedgewick (Don't worry, they couldn't hit an elephant at this distance) are actually genuine. I didn't include them because I assumed they were too good to be true.

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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Wed Jan 28, 2009 2:24 pm

EvotingMachine0197 wrote:
TheBear wrote:
In film-maiking, what does 'wrap' mean/stand for? As in, "That's a wrap!"

Something to do with protecting the film from further exposure ?? Just a guess...
Nope.

Any other takers?
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Wed Jan 28, 2009 2:29 pm

They would wrap the naked actors in blankets if they were finished?
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 2:22 am

An Irish county that elected two MPs to Westminster, in 1834 it had

* as MPs the sons of Henry Grattan and Daniel O'Connell

* among its magistrates the British Prime Minister and an ancestor of a future prime minister in Austria-Hungary.

Name that county.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 2:39 am

TheBear wrote:
EvotingMachine0197 wrote:
TheBear wrote:
In film-maiking, what does 'wrap' mean/stand for? As in, "That's a wrap!"

Something to do with protecting the film from further exposure ?? Just a guess...
Nope.

Any other takers?

I presume it's a variant on "wrap it up" or "wrapping up" - one of those phrases where a noun becomes a verb or a verb becomes a noun ('strategising' or 'architecting'). "Wrapped up" for finished in turn is probably literally in the sense of folding up gear and putting it away in its wrappings.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:16 am

ibis wrote:
TheBear wrote:
EvotingMachine0197 wrote:
TheBear wrote:
In film-making, what does 'wrap' mean/stand for? As in, "That's a wrap!"

Something to do with protecting the film from further exposure ?? Just a guess...
Nope.

Any other takers?

I presume it's a variant on "wrap it up" or "wrapping up" - one of those phrases where a noun becomes a verb or a verb becomes a noun ('strategising' or 'architecting'). "Wrapped up" for finished in turn is probably literally in the sense of folding up gear and putting it away in its wrappings.
Part of me thinks that the general term might have come from the more particular film-making term.

I gave the teensiest of hints in the question when asking what it stood for. (I haven't followed this thread too closely; at what point am I meant to reveal the answer?)
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:18 am

Keep it going, it's a good one.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:22 am

I give up so.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:23 am

That didn't last long... (Really?)
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:28 am

Are you dying to tell us? I'd like to know anyway

-- it's nothing to do with wrapping up naked actors in blankets then?
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:30 am

Wind, roll and process. (Looking at it written down, the comma may be superfluous.)
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:34 am

That's a good one now - "stand for" -- it wasn't even subtle. We're not lateral thinkers here.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 5:11 am

TheBear wrote:
Wind, roll and process. (Looking at it written down, the comma may be superfluous.)

I don't think that's true, alas - it looks like something made up to fit the word...'wrap' is a Middle English word, and the expression "wrap up" predates the film industry use of "it's a wrap" by quite some time. Indeed, the early film industry used the phrase "wrap it up" or "wrap up", which seems to come from theatre (as in "wrap party").

See here, for example: Online Etymology Dictionary.

In my defence, I looked this up afterwards.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Jan 29, 2009 1:10 pm

ibis wrote:
TheBear wrote:
Wind, roll and process. (Looking at it written down, the comma may be superfluous.)

I don't think that's true, alas - it looks like something made up to fit the word...'wrap' is a Middle English word, and the expression "wrap up" predates the film industry use of "it's a wrap" by quite some time. Indeed, the early film industry used the phrase "wrap it up" or "wrap up", which seems to come from theatre (as in "wrap party").

See here, for example: Online Etymology Dictionary.

In my defence, I looked this up afterwards.
Well, it's certainly what is meant by it in film-making. I accept that it may not be the origin of the more generally used term, though.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Feb 19, 2009 5:20 am

4 quick ones if thats okay....

In which country is the furthest inland point on the earths surface?

The wood sorrel plant is more commonly known as what?

What in London is the Frost Fair and when was it last held?

Apart from London which three other cities in Britain have an
underground railway system?
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Feb 19, 2009 7:31 pm

shutuplaura wrote:
4 quick ones if thats okay....

In which country is the furthest inland point on the earths surface?

The wood sorrel plant is more commonly known as what?

The shamrock!

shutuplaura wrote:
What in London is the Frost Fair and when was it last held?

A fair held on the ice of the frozen Thames - the last one was in 1814. There are modern festivals in London called Frost Fairs, but they don't count.

shutuplaura wrote:
Apart from London which three other cities in Britain have an
underground railway system?

I know Glasgow does, and I'm pretty certain Newcastle does. Not sure about the third...
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Feb 19, 2009 7:41 pm

shutuplaura wrote:
4 quick ones if thats okay....

In which country is the furthest inland point on the earths surface?

If zooming all the way out on google maps is anything to go by I'd say Russia.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Feb 19, 2009 8:20 pm

coc wrote:
shutuplaura wrote:
4 quick ones if thats okay....

In which country is the furthest inland point on the earths surface?

If zooming all the way out on google maps is anything to go by I'd say Russia.

I'd say china.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Feb 19, 2009 8:27 pm

I'll go for China too.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Feb 19, 2009 9:29 pm

Manchester?
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Thu Feb 19, 2009 11:50 pm

The third city has to be Sunderland. That's why it's called Sunderland. ;-)
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Fri Feb 20, 2009 3:12 am

Art is correct, its in Western China.

Ibis - Well done on shamrock and Frost fairs are indeed held on a frozen over Thames River. relatively common during the 'mini' ice age of the early modern period there hasn't been one since 1814.

Underground trains - Glasgow and Newcastle are correct.

Manchester and Sunderland do not have underground systems.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Fri Feb 20, 2009 3:57 am

shutuplaura wrote:
Art is correct, its in Western China.

Ibis - Well done on shamrock and Frost fairs are indeed held on a frozen over Thames River. relatively common during the 'mini' ice age of the early modern period there hasn't been one since 1814.

Underground trains - Glasgow and Newcastle are correct.

Manchester and Sunderland do not have underground systems.

I'm going to go a bet that it's Liverpool. Manchester has on-street trams, and Birmingham...is Birmingham, and as a result probably doesn't have a metro system.
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Fri Feb 20, 2009 7:05 am

ibis wrote:
shutuplaura wrote:
Art is correct, its in Western China.

Ibis - Well done on shamrock and Frost fairs are indeed held on a frozen over Thames River. relatively common during the 'mini' ice age of the early modern period there hasn't been one since 1814.

Underground trains - Glasgow and Newcastle are correct.

Manchester and Sunderland do not have underground systems.

I'm going to go a bet that it's Liverpool. Manchester has on-street trams, and Birmingham...is Birmingham, and as a result probably doesn't have a metro system.

Liverpool it is - well done
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PostSubject: Re: Tricky Pub Quiz questions.   Sun Feb 22, 2009 9:37 am

Okay, the trouble with Japans Finance minister reminder me of this - which tory party minister was accused of being the first minister to speak drunk from the dispatch box?

Wasn't Churchill by the way...
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Tricky Pub Quiz questions.
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