Machine Nation

Irish Politics Forum - Politics Technology Economics in Ireland - A Look Under The Nation's Bonnet


Devilish machinations come to naught --Milton
 
PortalPortal  HomeHome  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log in  GalleryGallery  MACHINENATION.org  

Share | 
 

 Food Watch

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 12:11 pm

Simply a thread to note events that may increase or decrease future food prices.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 12:29 pm

Argentina

There is a severe drought in southern parts of South America. Argentina is worst hit. The country is a major food exporter. As far as I am aware Argentina is;
3rd largest beef exporter in the world.
3rd largest soy exporter in the world.
Ranked 5th in maize production.
Ranked 11th in wheat production.
Major rice exporter.
It is also a major producer of wine, fruit and other crops.

The global positions may be a bit out of date, and there has been a general move out of cattle and into other crops. Suffice to say that Argentina is one of the worlds major food exporters and is expecting widespread crop failures.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 2:56 pm

That doesn't sound too good.

We had a Food Watch thread here before, but it got neglected because the economy pushed everything else out of the way and of course lower energy prices were perceived as lessening the severe problems there were last year.

http://machinenation.forumakers.com/economy-business-and-finance-f8/food-watch-t132-75.htm?highlight=food
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 3:55 pm

Then if someone moves the posts there it would tidy it up.

It should mean higher food prices. This is a mixed blessing for Ireland but IMO generally good for the rural economy. It also means less disposable income and perhaps less consumer imports.

Food is a bit like oil growing, population and increasing demand will lead to increasing prices. Overall this will benifit Europe, and countries like Australia and the USA.

Another area that I think we need to be concern about is the decreasing genetic diversity of our crops.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 5:20 pm

Squire wrote:
Then if someone moves the posts there it would tidy it up.

It should mean higher food prices. This is a mixed blessing for Ireland but IMO generally good for the rural economy. It also means less disposable income and perhaps less consumer imports.

Food is a bit like oil growing, population and increasing demand will lead to increasing prices. Overall this will benifit Europe, and countries like Australia and the USA.

Another area that I think we need to be concern about is the decreasing genetic diversity of our crops.

Last year rising prices of food lead to millions of people becoming rock bottom poor and hungry - the dollar a day bracket simply couldn't afford enough rice. There were riots and in Eygypt the government had to hand out bread.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 5:25 pm

Has anyone noticed food here actually going down?? we're supposed to be in the middle of deflation, but my shopping bills every Sat are still about the same as the middle of last summer. I usually shop in Lidl and/or Dunnes. Dunnes did hand out a shed load of value club vouchers at Xmas though... mine were worth almost 200 yoyos
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 5:57 pm

Squire wrote:
Then if someone moves the posts there it would tidy it up.

It should mean higher food prices. This is a mixed blessing for Ireland but IMO generally good for the rural economy. It also means less disposable income and perhaps less consumer imports.

Food is a bit like oil growing, population and increasing demand will lead to increasing prices. Overall this will benifit Europe, and countries like Australia and the USA.

Another area that I think we need to be concern about is the decreasing genetic diversity of our crops.
Have you examples in mind? I've read that GM crops could be responsible for a phenomenon happening the bee population. Called 'Colony Collapse Disorder' - could be the first species we'll notice we've endangered with frankenflowers.

Expat Girl

I haven't noticed prices dropping dramatically as I often shop in Lidl and Aldi too. Some foods like cat food I've noticed has increased in price as has tea. Can't say anything I've noticed is dropping dramatically in price - milk prices rose over the past few years for example but maybe they've stabilised now.

According to the internet food association website, quoting the New York Times, SPAM (invented in the U.S. during the Great Depression) is on the comeback
http://internetfoodassociation.wordpress.com/author/benadler/

Quote :
“We’ve seen a double-digit increase in the sale of rice and beans,” said Teena Massingill, spokeswoman for the Safeway grocery chain, in an e-mail message. “They’re real belly fillers.”

Kraft Foods said recently that some of its value-oriented products like macaroni and cheese, Jell-O and Kool-Aid were experiencing robust growth. And sales are still growing, if not booming, for Velveeta, a Kraft product that bears the same passing resemblance to cheese as Spam bears to ham.

Spam holds a special place in America’s culinary history, both as a source of humor and of cheap protein during hard times.

Invented during the Great Depression by Jay Hormel, the son of the company’s founder, Spam is a combination of ham, pork, sugar, salt, water, potato starch and a “hint” of sodium nitrite “to help Spam keep its gorgeous pink color,” according to Hormel’s Web site for the product.

Because it is vacuum-sealed in a can and does not require refrigeration, Spam can last for years. Hormel says “it’s like meat with a pause button.”
Exclamation

During World War II, Spam became a staple for Allied troops overseas. They introduced it to local residents, and it remains popular in many parts of the world where the troops were stationed.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/15/business/15spam.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=spam&st=cse

Yes, they mention Monty Python too.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 7:01 pm

Audi

I don't have to hand examples of reducing genetic diversity but it is a growing concern.

Regards bees some say it is a parasite that is reducing their immunity.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050517110843.htm

Another factor may be disease spread by commercial bees. (used to pollinate large greenhouses).

Honey is an interesting food. It is one food that is produced that benefits life in its production. I can't think of any similar food.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Mon Jan 26, 2009 7:02 pm

Mobile phones and bees? Did I hear something about that?
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Tue Jan 27, 2009 5:39 am

Squire wrote:
Argentina

There is a severe drought in southern parts of South America. Argentina is worst hit. The country is a major food exporter. As far as I am aware Argentina is;
3rd largest beef exporter in the world.
3rd largest soy exporter in the world.
Soya is a scandal. We should hope, for the sake of humanity, that the crop fails there. The only healthy forms of soya are the fermented forms -- miso, tamari, tempeh and natto -- and you don't eat much of them.

Here's the lowdown on soya:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2006/jul/25/food.foodanddrink
http://www.sonic.net/kryptox/medicine/pfpc/pfpc-soy-nutri.txt
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Tue Jan 27, 2009 1:28 pm

Alas there has been a move out of beef towards soya and I don't see that changing. About 50% is exported to China, but who knows the Argentinian government and its tax regime 44.1% may well solve the problem. Widespread unrest as a result of tax policy.

I believe that quite a high percentage of the grain produced there goes to produce fuel. Another sin.

If any of you think Ireland is badly run, spend time in Argentina. The official inflation rate is in single digits but is probably over 20%.
Back to top Go down
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   Wed Jan 28, 2009 2:28 pm

There's a plague of caterpillars in Liberia, which has destroyed their crops and polluted their water supplies. While it may not have much of an impact on our food prices, I would anticipate serious implications for Liberia and the surrounding countries.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Food Watch   

Back to top Go down
 
Food Watch
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Being wasteful with the Food for fast breaking.
» Food Tampering
» The Black Watch
» Eating food alone at home .
» Reoccuring Dream of "Food"

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Machine Nation  :: Machine Nation :: Agriculture and Food-
Jump to: