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 Fuel Price Watch Ireland

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PostSubject: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sun Jun 15, 2008 1:29 pm

Having heard on the news this morning that petrol costs an average of 130.6c per litre, I thought it might be interesting to track the price across the country.

I filled up passing through Mountmellick yesterday at 132.9 but passed another filling station selling it at 135.9 as I left the town. Both prices, obviously are well above the average quoted this morning.

Diesel was 142c.

143 for diesel and 132 for petrol at Clondalkin according to visitors here this morning.
What's it like where you are / where you're travelling?
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sun Jun 15, 2008 1:41 pm

Ennis, petrol: 131, 134, 135 getting nearer Ennis coming from old Limerick road.

Diesel was 149 yesterday in Liscannor Shocked
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:29 am

Killarney: Petrol 127, diesel 135

The paper The Kerryman is saying on its front page that rising fuel costs are threatening jobs in haulage and fishing.

http://www.politics.ie/viewtopic.php?f=160&t=10826
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:14 am

3.99 dollars and up here. Diesel is strange as it's price can be very different in the same town. Anywhere from about 4.59 to over 5 dollars a gallon.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Mon Jun 16, 2008 11:28 am

Unleaded 131.9 at Kilmurray Roundabout in Athlone.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Mon Jun 16, 2008 3:14 pm

youngdan wrote:
3.99 dollars and up here. Diesel is strange as it's price can be very different in the same town. Anywhere from about 4.59 to over 5 dollars a gallon.

Are taxation rates different for diesel than petrol? That could explain the price differential across various petrol stations.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Jun 19, 2008 7:48 pm

Auditor #9 wrote:
Ennis, petrol: 131, 134, 135 getting nearer Ennis coming from old Limerick road.
The prices above are now, 134, 135, 136 for petrol, 146 for diesel in the last one.

Feckin hell.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Jun 19, 2008 7:51 pm

Auditor #9 wrote:
Auditor #9 wrote:
Ennis, petrol: 131, 134, 135 getting nearer Ennis coming from old Limerick road.
The prices above are now, 134, 135, 136 for petrol, 146 for diesel in the last one.

Feckin hell.

Apparently you're quids in if you live near Kilkenny...
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Jun 19, 2008 11:57 pm

Taxes are the same at each station. I can only guess that the diesel in some of these stations last a long time as there are few cars on it. Also maybe it is only a small part of sales so they price it high and if little sells it is no big deal.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Fri Jun 20, 2008 2:27 pm

www.pumps.ie already have this problem cracked.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Fri Jun 20, 2008 2:29 pm

coc wrote:
www.pumps.ie already have this problem cracked.

That's deadly coc. Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Fri Jun 20, 2008 2:32 pm

cactus flower wrote:
coc wrote:
www.pumps.ie already have this problem cracked.

That's deadly coc. Very Happy
That's one for the Portal !

How real-time is it? Cos Kate P can post here from her laptop while driving around the Midlands looking at prices - multitasking you know
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Fri Jun 20, 2008 3:28 pm

Auditor #9 wrote:
cactus flower wrote:
coc wrote:
www.pumps.ie already have this problem cracked.

That's deadly coc. Very Happy
That's one for the Portal !

How real-time is it? Cos Kate P can post here from her laptop while driving around the Midlands looking at prices - multitasking you know

Here's Kate P on the Massey
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Aug 07, 2008 11:03 am

Prices around here lately - 129.9 for petrol, 139 for diesel.

Quote :
A barrel cost $118 yesterday, the lowest point since May 5, but petrol and diesel have not fallen by the same margin.

"The clearest protection for the consumer is competition, which we have in Ireland."

There are four main fuel retailers in Ireland -- Maxol, with 237 stations, 96 of which are owned by the company; Esso with 160 stations (40 company-owned); Texaco with 230; and Topaz with 300.
The Indo
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:14 pm

I got it for 125.7 in Tesco in Dundrum today - that was without purchasing shopping. I think if you had spent 100 in the shop you got it for 120.7 or something like it anyway.

It was 127.something at Esso in Dun Laoghaire.

I filled up €5 in each Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:32 pm

There is a bit of a trend of fuel prices coming down at the moment, so I'm never putting in more than €30 at a time.
While it was going up I would fill the tank to the brim at every opportunity.
I got it for 126.9 in the garrage at the Merrion Gates yesterday. I can't remember what garage it is. Maybe Texaco.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:36 pm

I'm surprised Maxol has so many stations, are there alot of them outside Leinster? I rarely see them.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:07 pm

Maxol is blue and yellow ? There's one in Ennis I know and one in Castlebar.

The cheapest I've seen it so far around here is 128.9 in a Texaco place in Ennis so ye're getting a nice little bargain in Dublin with 120. I usually fill up to the brim and then drive 300 miles but I might start doing what you're doing now AfricanDave...

I still say the stuff with the Techron ® goes longer ...
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sat Nov 01, 2008 6:10 pm

This post on the UK website Medialens ( http://www.medialens.org/ ) by Rhisiart Gwilym puts another perspective on fuel prices altogether - read it and...well...do something anyway:

"Pump prices need urgently to go to something over double what they are now, as quickly as possible, and probably quite a bit higher than that. Echoing Matt Simmons' often-repeated professional prescience: fuel prices currently are ludicrously too low, and need very urgently to come up to match somewhere around 300 to 500 USD/bbl (2008 dollar-value) for crude oil, to reflect the ending of the age of ultra-cheap, superabundant petroenergy.

Whilst we need to get off fossil-hydrocarbon energy sources altogether ASAP, the fact remains that for the transition period all six point something billion of us are critically dependent on fossil fuels -- particularly petroenergy -- to underpin our entire way of life, all the way from the disgustingly-richest of the Pampered Twenty Percent to the poorest of the Abused and Deprived Eighty Percent.

Petro makes everything else workable, including the renewables infrastructure; the generation of electricity (whichever actual fuel is burned); the maintenance of electrical grids; the mining and especially the transportation of coal, uranium ore, and every other fuel feedstock; the production of all other *essential* commodities, including food; and the transportation of absolutely everything.

Nor is there any -- repeat *any* -- prospect of the appearance in good time (absolutely crucial qualifier) of a replacement global tranportation airsealand fleet not dependent on the current huge daily flow of petroenergy to keep it functioning. Over the past 150 years we've painted ourselves into this damnfool corner, and now we have no alternative but to wait for the paint to dry before we can break out.

*** Without adequate supplies of petro into the immediately-upcoming decade or so, things fall apart big-time.***

And right now, global petro-production is on the dwell of the high spring tide: we've been on this short 'bumpy plateau' of crude production since Spring '05, with what looks like a racing certainty that the ebb will set-in in earnest not later than 2012. Even more horrifying: with the current downspike in oil price causing various new production ventures to be shelved or cancelled as no longer profitable, the prospect arises that the ebb may begin even sooner.

Even the always-lagging mediocre blinkered intellects of Brit bigbiz have just yesterday announced a study which mumbles that there could be an annual global oil-production chute of -- erm, well, ahh, about 9% a year, actually..... -- starting very soon. (Apply the exponential function to that! But be sure to sit down before you do.)

So fuel prices need very urgently to *rise* sharply, and to stay there -- pour encourager le conservation enorme et urgente.

Clearly, these price rises need to happen in steadily-applied stages, with open warning to all that this is how things are going to be, so get used to it, and get ready.

The alternative is that prices whack up suddenly, several times, without warning, causing instant chaos, and quite a lot of immediate catastrophe, with even more to come as the effects work through.

What isn't on offer for any great while longer is lots of fuel at low prices. At the moment the fuel business is on the same roller-coaster ride that everything else is suffering, with wild zig-zags of price, as the current stages of the Synergising Global Crises unfold.

As a result of the recent upspike, the oil companies have a lot of cash that they don't deserve, and shouldn't be allowed to keep, unless it's strictly earmarked, under constant public supervision, for crash-priority (and I do mean crash) development of a benign, ultra-low-carbon-footprint renewables infrastructure.

As a result of the current -- strictly transient -- downspike, people are being encouraged, with cruel inappropriateness, to demand lower pump prices again, to carry on the happy motoring fuel splurge for just a bit longer. Madness!

The only wise response for fuel-needing people is to prepare their personal circumstances ASAP for much less fuel usage, at much higher prices. (You could do like me, and find a life-style that allows you to swear off car ownership from here on, for example; the biking is great, even in Winter with the right relatively very cheap gear; the cash savings are chunky!).

Given the current clueless political climate in USuk, and the grovelling servitude of all currently-permitted politicians in our cod-democracies to corporate tyranny, it's probably savvy to prepare for actual unplanned fuel shortages (the most destructive sort, of course) some time within the next one-to-four years, with local snap fuel famines at the filling stations. (Already seeing those, transiently, of course, especially in the global citadel of freedom, justice and democracy, where their abundant way of life is "not negotiable". Irony? Don't talk to me about irony!)

Householders in this obedient-underling fiefdom of the empire who have gas heating/cooking might like to think about what they could do if -- no: when -- gas prices start on up again, and maybe -- as happened last year -- come close to actual shortages and use restrictions. Britain is in a desperate situation, comparable to very few other countries anywhere, in the matter of continuing adequate supplies of natural gas at affordable prices, into the foreseeable future. That prospect is truly dire. Google Euan Mearns' recent posts on The Oil Drum, for example, to self-educate your way into that area of understanding; the naive 'professionals' of the corporate media are absolutely not going to educate us about that in any sort of short order. They don't even seem to understand it themselves yet.

None of these serious prospects have shown the smallest sign of going away just because an economic depression has begun. Brief alleviation, maybe. But cured? Absolutely not. The fundamental, frightening situation hasn't changed. And as with adequate response to climate shift, 'our' politicians are still standing frozen in the headlights, paralysed by that peculiar cluelessness that's brought on by still clinging to an old paradigm that has just died. (That's 'growth forever')

It would help matters if we could get at least one major political party, and a corresponding crew of properly-radical politicians in government, who really were ours, and not the creatures of the corporations. But that, of course, requires a sociopolitical revolution. Roll on! As soon as you're ready folks.......

PS: Ban and recycle all non-essential sucker-trucks (that means virtually all of them) NOW, and apply progressive road-tax increases according to car weight and engine size, with unnecessarily large cars attracting disc prices of several thousand pounds per annum. Simple, immediate conservation measures, to go alongside progressive raising of fuel prices to around £2 to £3 (2008 £ value) a litre within a couple of years (except for red-agri diesel). That would be sanity. What chance? About nil -- for the moment, till enough of us have become sufficiently frightened......"


Other emm-enners are probably aware of The Oil Drum already but in case not here's a link - invaulable source of information on peak oil - should be compulsory reading for everyone really:

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/3720#more


Last edited by Aragon on Sat Nov 01, 2008 6:35 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Adding a link)
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sat Nov 15, 2008 5:39 am

I paid 1.97 a gallon this week. That is more like it
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sat Nov 15, 2008 5:47 am

youngdan wrote:
I paid 1.97 a gallon this week. That is more like it

That'll just get the V8 warmed up eh ? Fuel here is €1.09 a litre now and still dropping from the summer highs of the 1.40s. It's like Christmas for some people. Tescos are talking about doing it for a euro a litre if you spend 50 quid. Great for them.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sat Nov 15, 2008 5:58 am

I have a 15 seater van and I think there is either a 5.1 or 5.7 litre engine. She gets 13 miles to the gallon.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sat Nov 15, 2008 12:14 pm

105.9 near me
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sat Nov 15, 2008 12:30 pm

Johnfás that's very cheap. Our government takes 74 cents in tax so it can't go below that I suppose. Are you thinking of stocking up at all with a few dozen jerrycans or anything ?

youngdan what do you be doing with that van man ? Hopefully you're not driving up and down to New York in that mobile opposite of an oilrig. My own car is 1.3 and I get 42 mpg, apparently. The biggest car I've driven is a 2-litre and not for so long that I remember what it was like.

The price in the States and the cost of the barrel worldwide must mean a huge hiatus in demand - do any of ye notice any difference on the roads etc. ? Is the M50 as jam-packed as it used to be ? I'm definitely driving less in the last while though the price of petrol has fallen.
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PostSubject: Re: Fuel Price Watch Ireland   Sat Nov 15, 2008 12:36 pm

I don't drive that much, anywhere I generally go is within cycling distance which makes it free and keeps me fit Very Happy.

It makes a big difference to the other half though because she drives to Limerick and back most weeks.
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