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 Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme

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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:05 am

What's the story with the broadband plans anyone? I see it on RTE's website that there is some noise from the dept of communications and the marine and Eamon Ryan about a 'Ten-point plan' ..
http://www.rte.ie/news/2008/0703/broadband1.html

Damien Mulley is interviewed by RTE - why doesn't Eamo give him a role as a consultant if he doesn't have a job already?
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:47 am

Some critics have been saying that the funding that's been announced is funding that was already allocated. (I can't remember who exactly but there is a slight possibility that it might have been Adrian Weckler from the Sunday Business Post speaking on Matt Cooper's Last Word)
The story about Eamon Ryan's ten point plan was leaked in the Irish Times about 2 weeks before the actual announcement, which made me start to wonder....
Maybe the minister knew there wouldn't be the funding there and didn't want to make any announcement, then someone in the department leaked the plans to the newspaper so he was left with no choice but to announce the plans.....?
Maybe I've been watching too much Yes Minister.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:31 am

Is the biggest issue with broadband here that nearly ALL our telecomms infrastructure is in the possession of an AUSTRALIAN investment bank and a greedy employees union which have no interest in upgrading it because the return might be lower than the investment for one thing? Maybe they're waiting for something ...


There's an Eircom/Babcock & Brown/Babcock & Brown Capital Management watch going on over on the Pin since this time 2007 by 2Pack. He's keeping a close eye on it fair play and as far as I understand it the summary of the thread might be like this:

2Pack, Friday, 23rd August 2007 wrote:
OK Potted History.

The 2 largest heavy leverage operations in Australia are Macquarie and Babcock and Brown. They borrow in murky ways to get the fund to take over their targets and they then leve lots of bonds lying around in mysterious hedge funds.

Babcock have a subsidiary called BCM which owns eircom . It has no other asset .

Today it fell 3% in an otherwise stable market as you can see

http://markets.smh.com.au/apps/qt/quote.ac?code=bcm&section=summary&submit=Go&submit=

Macquarie was (this week) the big story in Australia when one of their hedge funds collapsed.

http://chart.bigcharts.com/custom/ft2-com/chart.asp?type=256&style=2027&size=1&symb=MBL&sid=139584&time=5dy&freq=15mi

http://mwprices.ft.com/custom/ft2-com/html-quotechartnews.asp?FTSite=FTCOM&q=MBL&searchtype&expanded=&countrycode=au&s2=au&symb=MBL&company=NEW

The interesting thing is what happened to eircoms ultimate owners, Babcock and Brown , at the same time as Macquarie

http://chart.bigcharts.com/custom/ft2-com/chart.asp?type=256&style=2027&size=1&symb=BNB&sid=1831064&time=5dy&freq=15mi

Something murky will soon be revealed there I feel !!

2Pack, Thursday August 16th, 2007 wrote:
Hopefully in receivership so that the state can buy network/wholesale back cheaply and feck retail and the verminous staff who leveraged it with debt over the years to line their own pockets Very Happy

A lean efficient eircom wholesale with no more than 3000 staff would be good for the country if in public hands

We can start our reducing line rental to the EU average straight away and roll out BB everywhere....if we can offload the €4.2bn debt as a day to day issue.

2Pack, Sunday, June 22nd, 2008 wrote:
I am not a bit surprised the Eircom Chairman Pierre Danon just fled rapidly when he read this document linked below. Danon could not in good conscience stand over these blatant lies and misrepresentations to the Australian Stock Exchange .

Babcock and Brown sure told a lot of LIES to the Australian stock exchange on page 21 of this recent valuation of eircom re: Broadband.

http://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/20080620/pdf/319r58pb2ljk80.pdf

89% of lines 'connected' counts a primary rate as 30 lines , it is not, it is one for broadband purposes .
882000 Broadband connections in 2007 includes 100000 3G mobile users who

a) are not actually broadband at ALL by the international OECD definition.
b) are with Vodafone or O2 or Hutchison 3 and not with eircom.

PAGE 58 of that PDF states that in reference to an asset table on page 57

1. Eircom has €2.4Bn of Shocked Goodwill Shocked
2. Eircom has €301m of Trademarks
3. Eircom has €264m worth of 'Relationships'

This lot make up €3bn which is posted to the eircom balance sheet and 'accounts'( to use the phrase advisedly) for about half their assets Shocked .

This is lunacy ...or fraud . eircom has if anything -€2.4bn worth of goodwill becuase everybody hates the loathsome slimebags .

Talk about subprime valuations Shocked being unrealistics.

They are completely fucked from what I can see if that goodwill and intangibles is the only thing that keeps them within their loan covenants .

Babcock 'increased' their goodwill from €1.5bn to €2.4bn when they bought them !

Green Bear, Sunday 17th August, 2008 wrote:
Quote :

Babcock & Brown Capital, the owners of Eircom, considered reducing the telco's large €3.7bn debt pile but decided it would not be "efficient'' or an "effective use'' of cash, instead opting to buy back shares. Meanwhile Babcock & Brown Capital executives are reviewing the company's future and whether to cut all links with Babcock and Brown, the Australian firm which originally set it up.

The Sunday Tribune understands that Babcock & Brown Capital and Eircom executives are concerned that a major slump in the shares of Babcock & Brown back in Australia is having a "drag'' effect on Babock & Brown Capital, which owns Eircom. It is also listed in Australia.
>>>>>


Babcock & Brown spurned chance to slash Eircom's debt
Emmet Oliver
http://www.tribune.ie/business/news/article/2008/aug/17/babcock-brown-spurned-chance-to-slash-eircoms-debt/

yoganmahew, Sunday 17th August 2008 wrote:
Hmm, I smell a rat, Mr. Fawlty. I smell B&B Capital being spun off with a huge debt pile that it can then default on without affected the parent company. This is being spun as B&B Capital cutting links with the parent, but I believe the reality is the opposite.

yoganmahew , Sunday 17th August wrote:
ray wrote:
mr_anderson wrote:
I still think it would be great if the government bought it back for a fraction of what it sold it for.
All they would really have to do is keep it going for another few years, wait until sentiment turns up again, then flog it back to the market at an overinflated price once more.

Is that a possibility, would any buyout not have to assume the debt that is piled on Eircom.
Not if, as 2Pack and I suspect, it is being set up to go bust with a mountain of debt. It is classic LBO method - Buy something with debt, squeeze it for all its worth for the next few years inflating its profits, pile on more debt that is taken out of the company into the LBO parent, spin it off as a going concern with its mountain of debt, watch it fall at the first slow-down, then buy the assets again for pennies on the pound. Rinse and repeat.
LBO - http://www.investopedia.com/terms/l/leveragedbuyout.asp

ragingbear wrote:
yoganmahew wrote:
ragingbear wrote:
It seems this genius believes that 3 years ago, ireland was ahead of other advanced countries.
To be honest, with digital exchanges already in place and with the metro area networks and the national fibre-optic network, the country was in good shape a few years ago.
No it wasn't - the top end internet services in ireland were and still are a joke compared to other countries.

The one and only time ireland was in good shape was after the digitization in the early 80's - the network isn't much better today than it was after that, and a handful of 2.5Gbit fibre rings isn't really going to cut it - funnily enough the swedes are currently decommissioning higher capacity lines inside cities than ireland is putting in nationally.

Check this out (especially the date) - it's no surprise that skype came from sweden, not ireland.

2Pack, Saturday 23rd August wrote:
bearishbull wrote:

Irish Gov should buy Eircom at a cheap price

I don't know if you noticed but eircom is worthless. It has debts of €4.2bn that it cannot service beyond about 2011 when it needs to refinance these debts at much much higher interest rates than at present. Its a dead man walking .

Getting it for €4.2bn involves taking on this debt, fuck that for a completely stupid idea. You also take on the parasitic union shitbags that voted for this exorbitant debt so they could pay tehmselves brown envelopes of cash .

These 'concerned' Comreg people should be the first quango to the wall in this country . They were the first sectoral regulator ever set up here and are a manifest failure.

They continue to set increasingly lower standards for other sectoral regulators to follow . Comreg should have forced eircom to invest not to bleed the company dry . They did not do so and deserve to die along with eircom or even just before them.

Comreg have a primary function was is deliver quality services at internationally comparable prices and at service levels commensurate with ( sit down before you read the next bit) ..a knowledge economy in the first world. Instead we have '3 Broadband' and Comreg let them away with it .

As for eircom , wait until well after it collapses under its debt before you make any move. It is a going concern in cash terms but not in any other terms .

With Comreg around eircom will cost too much. Abolishing Comreg in a timely manner would probably tip eircom over the edge for the simple reason that their replacement would not want to be abolished too and may be competent as a result .

The only circumstances under which I would consider swooping for eircom is at about 25c in the euro and with the greedy unions who voted 100% for this €4.2bn debt out of the ownership loop permanently and with pay cuts and 5 year no strike deals to wit .

Otherwise let it collapse and sack the lot of them . Then rehire a few useful ones perhaps , not too many mind .

Thank feck for mobile phones Cool

Indeed. The sad and continuing tale of B&B and Eircom ...

http://www.thepropertypin.com/viewtopic.php?t=2740
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:27 pm

Is Eircom for sale for the fifth time since privatisation less than 10 years ago? The meltdown of its current owner, Australian investment house Babcock Brown, means that Eircom, along with other saleable assets held by the Australian firm, is now in effect on the market. The Irish Times says
"No value has been put on Eircom as yet but it doesn't look like an attractive proposition with its large debts and an aging network in a slowing economy"

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/finance/2008/0822/1219353251552.html?via=mr

Boards.ie have been following this for some time:

www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php%3Ft%3D2054893153%26page%3D2+Babcock+Eircom+Sunday+Business+Post&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=7&gl=ie" class="postlink" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">link

Babcock and Brown is not a Telecoms group but a debt financed operation that lost 34% of its value last week and is assumed non-viable.
Babcock and Brown still doesn't consider its 57% stake in Eircom as of any great importance. Eircom is assumed to have lost value due to the economic recession in Ireland.

The privatisation of Eircom has been an unmitigated disaster. Eircom has kept its grip on the copper network and has kept a stranglehold on the development of alternatives and in particular broadband. Instead of selling Eircom, we could have kept it and invested in provision of a high quality broadband network across the country. Its buyers have marked it up and sold it on without investing.

Time to re-nationalise?

This is what imo we should be doing:

Quote :
Shannon Development Chief Executive, Kevin Thompstone, has called for the urgent rollout of a €4 billion high-speed broadband telecommunications infrastructure, across Ireland.

Speaking at the announcement of the Company’s 2007 end of year results on Tuesday, Thompstone said, “To be truly competitive in the knowledge economy, Ireland urgently needs to have ultra high speed broadband available in every part of the country. Clients from major international corporations will not wait a few years for the private sector to provide what is a vital piece of public communications infrastructure, they will simply vote with their feet and invest elsewhere.”

“While economic growth in Ireland is still high, in comparison to many of our European counterparts, we need to ensure that we are battle fit to meet the growing pressures of globalisation. One initiative which offers Ireland an opportunity to both catch up with and leap ahead of other parts of the world in relation to pervasive broadband access is the development of a national Next Generation Network (NGN). One of the key elements of NGN is that broadband is delivered not just to a town via a fibre ring but direct to enterprise and the home by means of fibre to the door.

http://www.finfacts.com/irelandbusinessnews/publish/article_1012341.shtml
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Wed Aug 27, 2008 10:30 pm

There are already some Metropolitan Area Networks around, which is a fiber circuit in and around our major urban areas but they aren't being connected to the home yet, far as I know. The cost of these was half a billion already and I'd like to find out more about these actually.

Could be if we rolled out some more that the value of Eircom would drop even more because of the saturation of broadband and I've little doubt it should be driven down in price and renationalised.

Lads it's a total fecking mess. Our comms infrastructure is owned by an Australian (mate) investment bank and our regulator is as useful as, to quote rockofcashel, an ashtray on a motorbike. The high court supported Eircom recently when ComReg wanted them reduce the wholesale charge from €8 to €3. The law getting involved in a national regulator of a small country's infrastructure which is owned by a company half way around the globe ... that's fucking Irish.

The consumer is caught in the middle. The only competition I can really hope for is with mobile broadband ... I'm convinced that we should have proper 3Meg download speeds now for half the price not paying another fiver a month like Eircom are asking now. There's no choice - it's a pure, unadulterated mess.

And we haven't even gotten on to talking about what shite that broadband will deliver yet either which is the most important part - but as 2Pack from the Pin above says, it's no wonder Skype emerged in Sweden, not Ireland.

Here's the Irish Times ComReg report, for some reason their webpage is eating up all my 100kb bandwidth Mad

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/finance/2008/0827/1219680030335.html
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Aug 29, 2008 2:37 pm

Because the Irish Times website is eating my bandwidth I resort to linking to the Property Pin. How bad? as they'd say in Cork

http://www.thepropertypin.com/viewtopic.php?p=120167#120167

Quote :
Babcock Brown signals end of role in Eircom
ARTHUR BEESLEY Senior Business Correspondent


BABCOCK BROWN'S stewardship of Eircom is set to end in the coming months after the troubled Australian investment bank said it was reviewing its management arrangement with the listed satellite fund that has direct ownership of Eircom.

The termination of the bank's management arrangement with the Babcock Brown Capital (BCM) fund could lead to a sale of Eircom, according to sources close to the company. However, the financier who orchestrated the Australian takeover of Eircom only two years ago insisted yesterday that the company is not for sale at the moment.

.....

In a statement yesterday, BCM said it hoped to conclude discussions on "any internalisation of management" in time for its annual meeting in November.

However, any termination of the arrangement would be subject to BCM and the bank reaching agreement on a compensation package for the loss of management fee income from a contract that has 23 years to run. "Given that they earn substantial management fees, they're unlikely to give it up for free," Mr Topfer said.

BCM paid Aus$34 million (€19.93 million) in management fees to the bank last year, a sum calculated according to the value of the fund's net tangible assets.

The poor performance of the fund's share price, which lost 6.6 per cent yesterday and currently implies a market capitalisation on the business of only Aus$505.43 million (€296.1 million), meant that further share-based fees were not payable.

Eircom, whose debt amounts to some €3.46 billion, yesterday reported an 8 per cent rise to €698 million in earnings before interest tax depreciation amortisation and one-off items.

Mr Topfer said BCM continued to enjoy good relations with the Eircom employee share ownership trust, which owns 35 per cent of the telco, but acknowledged that Babcock Brown's troubles were unhelpful. "Are they happy to have the noise that surrounds Babcock Brown, my guess is that the answer to that is no."
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Thu Jan 22, 2009 10:58 pm

Still 10% of Ireland without Broadband coverage or was it 30% I heard on the Six One news ? Haven't got the technical details of this yet but Eamon Ryan today announced the "National Broadband Scheme" which was criticised by FG as being low quality. And about the extent of which Damien Mulley was dubious.

Is it a wireless service through "3" ? I imagine it will be part wired but a bigger part will be via mobile phone-like technology and masts. Or perhaps it will be a change in some exchanges or have they all been unbundled ?

Johnny Murphy just outside Maam Cross or somewhere in the middle of nowhere would still have a phone line - why that can't be used I'm not sure - speed of exchanges or what ? Maybe the contention ratio would be so low that Johnny would have a whole line to himself ! i.e. 200mb broadband !

Minister Ryan's youtube feature gives no meaty technical detail ..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MThoczfIwa8
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Jan 23, 2009 2:13 am

10% of the population, 30% of the area of the country? Bandwidth problems nearly everywhere...
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Jan 23, 2009 1:13 pm

Ah that could be it cactus. The bandwidth is often worser in Dublin because of the numbers of people sharing the same lines.

Report in Examiner today - they say the ComReg is often complaining about the speeds of mobile broadband - is it really that bad ??? I wonder why ComReg would moan about that now.

People who have mobile broadband here - is it fine for watching youtube stuff, downloading, uploading, skype, blogtv, Dáil tv and streaming - that's a measure of how good it might be for the consumer. For businesses then they could be right.

If you have mobile broadband and find it troublesome to do any of the above then we ARE in the dark ages.

http://www.examiner.ie/story/ireland/idcwgbkfgb/rss2/
Quote :
23 January 2009

‘Dark ages’ jibe as Ryan launches broadband plan two years late
By Mary Regan, Political Reporter

THE Government has been accused of living in the "dark ages" after it announced the roll-out of broadband across the entire country by September 2010 — more than two years after it was promised.

Communications Minister Eamon Ryan announced that 170 jobs will be created in a €223 million investment to bring high-speed telecommunication connections to all rural parts of the country.

Ireland has 1.2 million broadband users and the National Broadband Scheme will target the 33% of the country which has no access to always-on, high-speed internet. The scheme will enable about 223,000 more homes and businesses to connect to the internet.

Mobile operator, 3, will provide the service, with investment coming privately from the company as well as exchequer and EU funds.

Fine Gael expressed concern about the scheme, which was originally due to be agreed in July 2008. Communications spokesman Simon Coveney said: "Minister Ryan had repeatedly promised that everyone in the country would have the capacity to receive broadband by the end of 2009. Does he seriously expect rural Ireland to thank him for announcing a service that is at least 20 months away?"

Mr Coveney also raised concerns about the capacity of the planned network.

"I have a real concern that the proposed broadband solution is based almost solely on mobile broadband on a mobile network. Mobile broadband speeds are regularly far below the maximum advertised speed. Com Reg and many other commentators continue to question the reliability and capacity of mobile broadband technologies, particularly in a business context."

The Labour Party said the broadband scheme leaves Ireland in the dark ages. Senator Alan Kelly — a euro candidate for Labour in Ireland South and a former information technology worker — expressed concern with the speed of the internet connection being offered.

"The scheme provides for upload speeds of 1.8mbps (megabits per second) for businesses using wireless, or 128kbps for those using satellite. That’s scarcely better than a dial-up modem. At the same time our international competitors in places like India, China and Japan enjoy speeds of 40mbps. In other words, Ireland is not at the races and has no prospect of ever being at the races if Eamon Ryan has his way," said Mr Kelly.

Recent figures from the Central Statistics Office show Ireland has one of the worst levels of household broadband usage in Europe.

A total 43% of the country’s 1.5 million households have a broadband connection compared with 62% in Britain and 74% in Denmark and the Netherlands.

Mr Ryan, a Green Party TD, said hundreds more jobs will be protected and created as the network attracts more investment in rural areas. "For too long, rural Ireland has been without this essential service," he said.

"Now businesses throughout the country can have ready access to the national and international markets. Employment will be created and sustained. Quality of life will improve for rural residents and communities strengthened," Mr Ryan said.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Feb 27, 2009 10:46 pm

Quote :
Value of Eircom cut by more than €700m


THE AUSTRALIAN owners of Eircom have cut the value of their investment in the telecoms company by more than €700 million, acknowledging that they overpaid for the business when they bought it for €2.36 billion less than three years ago.

In financial results to be published this morning, the writedown of almost three-quarters of a billion euro will be attributed to a marked deterioration in the outlook for Eircom’s profits and its increasing pension deficit.

Profits are falling due to the combined forces of economic contraction and aggressive competition from rival firms which are radically undercutting Eircom’s prices for certain products.

The pension deficit in the company, whose debts exceed €3.7 billion, now stands at some €450 million.

Eircom will embark on a cost-saving exercise in light of these pressures, leading some sources to speculate that a round of job cuts is on the way. However, there will be no announcement today of any retrenchment programme.

...

BCM and its affiliates own 65 per cent of Eircom and members of the Eircom employee share ownership trust (Esot) own the remaining 35 per cent. Esot members – certain staff and former staff – have received several big payments from Eircom since its controversial privatisation a decade ago.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/frontpage/2009/0227/1224241894622.html
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Feb 27, 2009 10:58 pm

I posted on another thread the other day that Waterford Port was five years trying to get broadband.
It is our main container port along with Dublin.

Having said that, we have moved up the scale in the last three years. We need to push on. We are an island on the edge of Europe. We need the best broadband in the world.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Feb 27, 2009 11:19 pm

Eircom and our national phone lines should never have been privatised.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Feb 27, 2009 11:20 pm

Certainly the phone lines never should have been.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Feb 27, 2009 11:22 pm

snapple drinker wrote:
Eircom and our national phone lines should never have been privatised.

It's an awful shame we just spent 7bn on some banks instead of buying back Eircom ... I wonder how the return compares between both of them per year ?

I think if we had bought Eircom back then everyone would understand kinda where the money went .... unlike the banks.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Feb 27, 2009 11:29 pm

Nationalisation without compensation ? Where did I hear about this ? Or subtract the profits/earnings to date from the purchase price?
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Feb 27, 2009 11:49 pm

Quote :
However, any termination of the arrangement would be subject to BCM
and the bank reaching agreement on a compensation package for the loss
of management fee income from a contract that has 23 years to run
.
"Given that they earn substantial management fees, they're unlikely to
give it up for free," Mr Topfer said.

BCM paid Aus$34 million
(€19.93 million) in management fees to the bank last year, a sum
calculated according to the value of the fund's net tangible assets.

Let's see now, you take the 23 years remaining on that contract, mmmm, you multiply it by that €19.93 million. mmmm affraid (as you can see I'm no auditor Audi but that's mucho deneros no?)

Who will pick up the tab for board of management golden parachutes?
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Sat Feb 28, 2009 12:01 am

snapple drinker wrote:
Quote :
However, any termination of the arrangement would be subject to BCM
and the bank reaching agreement on a compensation package for the loss
of management fee income from a contract that has 23 years to run
.
"Given that they earn substantial management fees, they're unlikely to
give it up for free," Mr Topfer said.

BCM paid Aus$34 million
(€19.93 million) in management fees to the bank last year, a sum
calculated according to the value of the fund's net tangible assets.

Let's see now, you take the 23 years remaining on that contract, mmmm, you multiply it by that €19.93 million. mmmm affraid (as you can see I'm no auditor Audi but that's mucho deneros no?)

Who will pick up the tab for board of management golden parachutes?

Who puts these contracts together in the first place. ? Jesus almighty up a telephone pole.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Thu Mar 12, 2009 12:33 pm

Quote :
EIRCOM IS reviewing its level of investment in its next generation of broadband networks as a result of the economic downturn, it told an Oireachtas committee yesterday.

Appearing before the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Communications, Energy and Natural Resources yesterday, the company said it plans to upgrade its core network from copper wire to fibre at urban centres and regional towns throughout the country by 2011.

It is also upgrading its current network to deliver speeds of 1 Mbit to 24 Mbits per second.

However, the company could not give the committee a definite figure on investment

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2009/0312/1224242738457.html
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Thu Mar 12, 2009 2:38 pm

The Independent has an editorial on this today..
http://www.independent.ie/opinion/editorial/narrow-focus-on-broadband-1669936.html
Quote :
As things stand, Ireland's home broadband usage is the lowest in Europe, ranking with those of Latvia and Lithuania.

Eamon Ryan's promise followed the awarding of a contract to the telecommunications company, 3. However, the company's brief is to provide wireless broadband, which is no substitute for a countrywide fixed-line system, and must be regarded only as an interim measure.

If we hope to continue doing business on equal terms with the rest of the world and to attract inward foreign investment, the Government must prioritise the provision of fixed-line broadband.

This is has to be an essential part of any strategy for recovery.

Eircom has said it wont provide further than 5 km from an exchange. The National Broadband Scheme, that is supposed to provide broadband access for all has only attracted two bidders, one of whom is Eircom. The bids will be decided on today.
http://www.independent.ie/business/media/decision-tomorrow-on-broadband-competition-1513126.html

In fact, it has just been announced that Eircom's competitor 3Ireland won the NBS bid.

http://www.independent.ie/business/irish/broadband-has-little-bandwidth-and-a-miserable-rural-reach-much-to-the-frustration-of-many-48687.html

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/all-wired-up-as-i-cant-work-from-home-128611.html

http://www.independent.ie/business/irish/sme-majority-want-to-use-broadband-system-82796.html

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/all-wired-up-as-i-cant-work-from-home-128611.html

http://www.independent.ie/business/technology/eircom-loses-out-as-3-ireland-wins-836440m-contract-for-highspeed-broadband-service-1552726.html

It isn't only small business and home users that have been hit by lack of broadband and poor speeds. I read recently that it took 5 years for Waterford Port (our second biggest container port) to get broadband and the CEOs of US companies have repeatedly over the last years emphasised the lack of broadband capacity is a threat to their continuing here.

Given that broadband is the key means of reducing the National competitive disadvantage that results from of our peripheral location, and given our reliance on high tech FDI, and the clear indication that we are dependent on a "Smart Economy" if we are to maintain anything like our former prosperity, the Government's catastrophic failure on Broadband would in my opinion be a sufficient cause to call for their resignation.

The plans currently in place are generally viewed as too little and too late.


Last edited by cactus flower on Fri Mar 13, 2009 12:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Mar 13, 2009 12:03 am

Nationalising the network may be the only option based on gross mishandling by Eircom. They are destroying a national infrastructure. The British Government did it with their rail network (whilst keeping train companies private) after the train companies *****d up the rail network.
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PostSubject: Re: Telecoms and Broadband in Ireland - What Should Be Done ? / National Broadband Scheme   Fri Mar 13, 2009 2:10 am

cactus flower wrote:
In fact, it has just been announced that Eircom's competitor 3Ireland won the NBS bid.

The NBS website have a nice layout of information on their rollout and plan to do it by 'Electoral Division' - is that like a Barony or Parish? Whatever it is, Eircom (or the Exchequer if we still had Eircom) will miss out on the revenue from the customers below - lucky NBS.

Quote :
How many buildings will receive broadband under the NBS?
Approximately 223,000 residential, commercial and business premises will receive broadband connectivity.
http://www.three.ie/nbs/faqs.htm



What would happen if tons of people switched over to Perlico or BT or whoever in the morning? Eircom must be relying heavily on finance from their cash-cow here ... if they lost a lot of business here tomorrow morning would they flog the network after a couple of months or would they keep it alive artificially in wait for the competitors to shed some customers or what?

Quote :
Eircom stalls on broadband rollout.

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/eircom-stalls-on-broadband-rollout-1669857.html

EIRCOM has refused to commit to investing in the super high-speed broadband which experts say Ireland will need to compete with the rest of the world.

A senior Eircom director told an Oireachtas committee yesterday that the company was unsure of the demand for ultra high-speed fixed-line broadband, and was reluctant to commit to the huge investment required.

...
"We are not in a position at this point to say what our commitment will be." .... Neutral

....
While Eircom predicted there would be nationwide availability of broadband at speeds ranging from 1 to 24 megabits per second by 2011, it accepted that a "residual" part of rural Ireland would have to depend on wireless broadband. (under National broadband scheme, all areas will come under some broadband coverage by September 2010 - Audi)

The committee also heard that, because of technical difficulties, people in parts of rural Ireland who live more than 5km from a telephone exchange will never get quality broadband.

Committee members yesterday claimed the company was "saddled" with enormous debt, but Eircom countered that its debt was "manageable" and that it was completing a €1bn investment programme to upgrade telephone exchanges.

But Fine Gael questioned whether Eircom had the capital to invest in what was needed to roll out high-speed broadband, which would be a key to the country's economic future.

Communications spokesman Simon Coveney claimed: "What people are quietly saying is that Eircom is so indebted that it is finding it difficult to be able to find resources to roll out the new generation broadband that is required.

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/eircom-stalls-on-broadband-rollout-1669857.html

Eircom seem to be zombified as well now - they don't know how much money or income they'll have in order to upgrade their network. However, considering it costs €500 a metre to lay optic fibre (!) I'm not surprised they have no intention of spending that on getting fibre to the home of every Mary Jane around the Burren or whereever - they'll have to make do with the wireless broadband when it comes.


(I can't believe it costs 500 euros to lay one metre of cable here - I've lost the link to the site which said it. On the BBC they say it costs upto £200 for a metre there so ... maybe the 500 is right - very steep though
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7104011.stm )


http://machinenation.org/forum/viewtopic.php?&f=43&t=560&start=0
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