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PostSubject: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 4:11 am

Ella Fitzgerald - watch and enjoy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rG71yD8UUbE&NR=1
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 4:47 am

ah yes afro

little bit o' the Count for ya bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpPehptG3yw
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 5:05 am

The Boys. 1977.

I don't wanna talk about it


So come and get me .....
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 6:18 am

EvotingMachine0197 wrote:
The Boys. 1977.

I don't wanna talk about it


So come and get me .....

It reminds me about how a music industry magazine once asked leading performers and composers in classical, folk, rock, blues and another genre to listen to a selection of music outside their genre and rate what they heard. Queen was rated across all genres by all participants as the best. Classical musicians in particular raved about Queen's music, the arrangements, the vocals, the harmonies, etc. (One classical composer said he would so love to hear Freddie Mercury compose an opera. He reckoned Mercury could compose one of the great operas that would be played for centuries to come. When Montserrat Caballé first met Mercury to work with him on the album Barcelona she described herself as "overwhelmed" by his talent. Their first planned-to-be-short meeting lasted 16 hours and she said after his death that he was the most talented person she ever met with an incredible ear for music and harmony.)

Second in the list, just behind Queen, as the next composer who could appeal of across all genres without exception, was Mozart, who seemed to be the secret listening of leading rock stars and bands even before the survey.

The striking thing about both Queen and Mozart is that so much of their music doesn't date and sounds fresh as if it was just composed. I heard an arrangement of some of Mozart's music done as techno and it worked perfectly. (People who heard it in the niteclub wouldn't believe when I told them that it was composed by Mozart!) You'd never think it was over 200 years old. Similarly so much of Queen's music sounds as though it could have been composed today, not some of it forty years ago. I guess it is true what they say about how the great composers' work travells across genres and generations, and never gets stuck in its own time even if a product of that time. People will be playing Queen decades from now, long after most contemporary composers across the genres will have become forgotten.

That's how Debussy's Clare de Lune could be used by a television ad and work so well, why Mozart's Lacrimosa can still get people hooked, why fifty years on people still play and love the Beatles, why the Moody Blues' Nights in White Satin is still played, or how Elvis's A Little Less Conversation, remixed by JXL, could work so brilliantly, while most of their contemporaries have long since been forgotten. Of the two million pieces of music registered in the 1960s, only about 300 are still played. Similarly very few musical contemporaries of Mozart are ever played now. And that is why our kids and grandkids will be playing Queen for decades to come, and loving it as much as we did when we first heard it and first bought our first Queen album, in my case back in vinyl in the 1970s. Thank you for the music, Freddie.
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 6:55 am

Jaysus PK, you put me to shame with the verbose , and lovely to read descriptions.

I'm a bit shorter on words.

The man broke my heart when he died. He still breaks my heart, because if it were not for him I don't think I would have got through my 20s alive.

Even now, if I need a kick, I put Freddie on.

Long live Freddie.
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:08 am

Ditto.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pC4ZOxpu2rs

There's no chance for us,
It's all decided for us,
This life has only one sweet moment set aside for us,

Sad
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:44 am

CitiZenJon wrote:
Ditto.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pC4ZOxpu2rs

There's no chance for us,
It's all decided for us,
This life has only one sweet moment set aside for us,

Sad

Where's forever anyway

cheers
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Sun Feb 22, 2009 11:31 am

I love these guys

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZhheuPDsyQ

Came across a funny thread on Freerepublic trying to link these guys to communism because the original Decmeberists were liberal early 19th century Russians and (of Course) everything liberal and russian is commie.
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Fri Mar 13, 2009 7:02 am

To understand the significance of these songs to me you would really need to know the feeling of bitterness and sadness I had when I was about 12-13. I had been through 5 years of custody battles and attempts at contesting various wills. From 12 I literally lived in boarding school and when most others had disappeared home I read a lot, befriended the cats, did some gardening and listened to all sorts of music. On the other side of the earth I had left behind Angelino, so reference to horses is significant. Anyway came across this tune, the tone seemed to suit my mood at the time and the chorus apt. Chariots of silk she rode, stallions of gold she owned. Still brings tears to my eyes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lR5dWDKcFG8

and this one touched on my anger. The tone of both seemed to suit my mood.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9ydnfoChZg

A box of doves
I placed beside your chest
Liar
A stork of silk
With rubies in it's nest
Fire
Of my love
Will burn thee to a wizened word
For ere to go unheard.

A mare of wood
Elder, elm and oak
Liar
Will keep you fair
If you jest me no joke
Fire
Of my love
Will burn thee to a wizened word
For ere to go unheard.

I'm old and bruised
But my fate is that of youth
Liar
Trickster you
Be a grisly dragon's tooth
Fire
Of my love
Will burn thee to a wizened word
For ere to go unheard.

You gashed the heart of my heart
Like a Portuguese
Witch,
I'd planned for you this land
But you devoured my hand.
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Fri Mar 13, 2009 10:43 am

Squire wrote
Quote :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lR5dWDKcFG8


Quote :
The toad road licked my wheels like a sabre
Winds of the marsh lightly blew
Stone jars stacked with stars on her shoulders
Hunters of pity she slew.

Chariots of silk she rode
Stallions of gold she owned.

A mad Mage with a maid on his eyebrows
Hunteth the realm for a God
Who could teach him the craft of decanting
The glassy entrails of a frog.

The Bard of my birth with his ballet
Walked the wild worlds in the chase
For the black chested canary
Who as a moose can sing bass.

Morning Squire,

there's magic and escapism and sensuality in that - I can see why it spoke to you. Even when he was rocking, Bolan had a knack of creating 'soul' songs, the effect of which stays with you long, long after the little two inches of music are over. He's always reminded me of Jane Austen who wrote the following to her nephew about some chapters of his writing that had gone missing...

Quote :
What should I do with your strong, manly, spirited sketches, full of variety and glow? How could I possibly join them on to the little bit (two inches wide) of ivory on which I work with so fine a brush, as produces little effect after much labour?

I can't explain it but will let it speak for itself.
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Fri Mar 13, 2009 12:00 pm

My heart broke once. I was so caught up in the physical pain of it for so long I actually didn't know I'd been a little bit in love to start with; it took a friend to tell me that a while after the event.

It was a peculiar time, walking around the world with my chest cavity cracked wide apart, my heart occasionally throwing its head back like a lion, opening its jaws to roar, physically stopping in my tracks to consciously breathe because there was no oxygen left.

I didn't think for a long while - all of my responses came from my gut which was busy re-interpreting the world like a child getting to know the feel of the objects that surround it.

I felt I was dying; looking back on it, I wonder if I was ever more aware of being alive.

It rarely happens in life that we meet people with whom we vibrate at the same frequency - even for a short while and even in the most unexpected of situations. Hamlet said that we should 'grapple them to our hearts with hoops of steel' those friends we have whose loyalty is proven but there are some people who grapple themselves to our hearts and we have no control over it at all.

A few select people inhabit rooms in our souls and sometimes they close the door fully behind them when they leave. Other times - more often than we like to think, I suspect, they leave the door slightly ajar. Every now and again the east wind catches it, rushes in and violently swoops into every corner. Then it leaves again, the door still on the latch so a sneaky draught can get through when we least expect it, even when the pain is long past and life has moved on and we're happily and wholey in love with other people.

The album is Closing Time by Tom Waits and it tells the whole story much better than I could, right down to the title tune at the very end. Tracks two and eight make the wind blow every so slightly stronger.

It was recorded and released the year before I was born and I think it seeped into my consciousness even then. Maybe the whole album is a cliché - it's not even his best work, but it's my favourite music.
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PostSubject: Re: favourite music   Fri Mar 13, 2009 2:49 pm

Kate P

I do like Jane Austin she is such a good observer of humanity, and obviously it is young squire in the strictly pantomime sense. It is a convenient flag in the land of blogging. I admire people who have a skill with words, who can conjure with emotions and abstractions and put them into words. It is beyond me, perhaps too many countries in early childhood, but I think, in truth, it is just me. It is a skill I do not have.

At an early age I developed a liking for getting things done, perhaps it started as a form of escape to funnel emotion and raw anger. Yet I do like painting and design, gardening and herbaceous borders, the scents on a warm still evening, a beautiful fabric, a well turned phrase, but I like to do and have a restless sole.

I always liked the different, the interesting, the attempt to create and so in what I initially saw as my newest prison, I roamed through records and books with verve, and one that stood out and suited my mood at the time was the early T-Rex.

There are people who have minds for detail and points, but to me what matters is flexibility, adaptability and not the detail but a feeling for the great flows of humanity and the occasional flashes of brilliance in whatever field be it Omar Khayyam, Newton or Hannibal. Then there are the many unrecorded heroes, the sheer beauty, skill and craftsmanship of so many people who create amazing products and works of art. Medieval cathedrals are simply stunning achievements from roof to foundation.

Yet back in the 'real' world we have wasters scheming and trying to acquire wealth by questionable means and people who kill and destroy. It amazes me that anyone should defend or excuse such activity. One lesson I did learn in childhood is that you show such scoundrels no quarter for they will take it as weakness and abuse good will.

I don't think I will ever properly come to terms with my childhood. It was privileged, but my mother died soon after I was born, my father not long after and my grandmother 7 years later. Then 5 years of dislocation and that stallion meant a lot to me. So chariots of silk she rode, stallions of gold she owned had an air of futility about it, but it is beautifully crafted. Strange I still keep houses and furniture I should probably sell but they are what ties me to a past and people I did not know, silly really.


PS I will give Tom Waits a listen when I have a bit of time to hunt it out.
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