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 Survival of the fittest

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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 8:55 pm

floatingingalway wrote:
Auditor #9 wrote:
Can we start growing anything right now? It might be too late soon - remember the Famine and all.

It's high time we found out what stuff we can eat from the woods, fields, the sea too. Luckily I live near the sea and, though polluted, you'd be inclined to eat it if you were stuck.

I'd go fishing if I could get a solar-powered television to watch - otherwise it'd be very boring I'd say.
I've got cos lettuce under cloches, beetroot, carrots, red cabbage, and rocket on the go at the moment.
Fishing never rocked my boat either, boring as watching paint dry

I've grown some rocket for the first time - nice, but very bitter. To eat, or not to eat? Question
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 8:57 pm

cactus flower wrote:
floatingingalway wrote:
Auditor #9 wrote:
Can we start growing anything right now? It might be too late soon - remember the Famine and all.

It's high time we found out what stuff we can eat from the woods, fields, the sea too. Luckily I live near the sea and, though polluted, you'd be inclined to eat it if you were stuck.

I'd go fishing if I could get a solar-powered television to watch - otherwise it'd be very boring I'd say.
I've got cos lettuce under cloches, beetroot, carrots, red cabbage, and rocket on the go at the moment.
Fishing never rocked my boat either, boring as watching paint dry

I've grown some rocket for the first time - nice, but very bitter. To eat, or not to eat? Question
I love it in a salad. It's also delicious to make pesto with.
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 9:00 pm

coc wrote:
OK, now I am freaking out.

It's bad enough that yous're on about stockpiling food but now yous're growing your own spuds! I thought spuds were made by SuperValu and Dunnes Shocked

Where can you get these 'seed-potatoes' you speak of?

We've been at this on Machine Nation since the week we set up - we're either very forward looking, or very backward looking, or possibly both.

Auditor #9 - this is the right course for you: How to be a hunter gatherer in Ireland - too late for this year but you could put your name down for 2009.

http://www.lavistownhouse.ie/programme.html
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 9:07 pm

Cactus that's in Kilkenny - I always wanted to go there. I'd love to do the foraging course. Bins, woods, the lot. Like Rambo. I'd love to do some other courses too and I might learn the name of some flowers properly, you'd never know. I've a good knack at remembering the ones you can eat alright.

I'm disappointed with those people that they are not called
"Breadmaking with Olivia Hunter"
"Building stone walls with Roger Baker"
"Fishing with Mike Carpenter"
"Making rope from asses hair with John Fisher".

There's a lot to be said for knowing how to do basic stuff with one's hands all the same.
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 9:30 pm

Didn't know where to put this phone conversation I've just had but decided on this thread because it deals with what the young wage-earners do to survive in the modern Irish economy.

Long story - short. Just got off the phone with a yound fella (25-29) who called to ask about nixers (wee side jobs). Told him I'd let him know of any jobs, but his story is kinda of frightening as he just related.

He works full time as a painter but always has a wee extra job of his own to do at night and on the weekends. He told me that he'd bought a new home in 2006 for 185K. Well, his SU bought it. She went out to view a new estate and when he came back from work that evening she'd all but emptied their savings to use as a deposit in case someone else snapped up the property. affraid

He may have to start using his savings at the moment although he's still working full time, as is the SU, but the wee side jobs made all the difference. As he says, he knows people have money but they aren't spending like they used to.

He told me his only consolation is that the property is now worth an additional 100K now. Why is it worth 100K more today? I didn't have the heart to ask. Rolling Eyes

I just wonder has a good proportion of a generation been hampered by this type of thinking? He believes that everything will turn around at the beginning of the new year. I hope he's right. There doesn't seem to be any real thought for the future, and when thinking is directed at the future it's in terms of asset appreciation only. The risk side of the equation just doesn't seem register with many of his cohorts.

Survival of the economic/financial fittest will probably be a more telling factor in the future.
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 9:51 pm

It must be very difficult for anyone who has no memory of the 80's to have any grasp of what is about to happen to them. For those of us who do remember the 80's means we also experienced the 70's which puts us in a much better position. I have gone from having absolutely no sympathy for people who fell for the V.I's lines to despair about them.
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 10:23 pm

On the subject of that youngfella and the 185k illiquid asset and the pampered mindset - is it the case I wonder that they want to sell just to either move sideways - usually up - but just move. There's always this myth that "you need to find a job for life" but that's highly idealised. People might simply want to move from Dungarvan to Glanmire but can't because of illiquidifiable assets. Worth a fortune on paper of course but they can't move 40 miles down the road to get a slightly better or more suitable job. Or be closer to family.
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 10:37 pm

rockyracoon wrote:
Didn't know where to put this phone conversation I've just had but decided on this thread because it deals with what the young wage-earners do to survive in the modern Irish economy.

Long story - short. Just got off the phone with a yound fella (25-29) who called to ask about nixers (wee side jobs). Told him I'd let him know of any jobs, but his story is kinda of frightening as he just related.

He works full time as a painter but always has a wee extra job of his own to do at night and on the weekends. He told me that he'd bought a new home in 2006 for 185K. Well, his SU bought it. She went out to view a new estate and when he came back from work that evening she'd all but emptied their savings to use as a deposit in case someone else snapped up the property. affraid

He may have to start using his savings at the moment although he's still working full time, as is the SU, but the wee side jobs made all the difference. As he says, he knows people have money but they aren't spending like they used to.

He told me his only consolation is that the property is now worth an additional 100K now. Why is it worth 100K more today? I didn't have the heart to ask. Rolling Eyes

I just wonder has a good proportion of a generation been hampered by this type of thinking? He believes that everything will turn around at the beginning of the new year. I hope he's right. There doesn't seem to be any real thought for the future, and when thinking is directed at the future it's in terms of asset appreciation only. The risk side of the equation just doesn't seem register with many of his cohorts.

Survival of the economic/financial fittest will probably be a more telling factor in the future.

He sounds like a worker and a survivor rockyracoon. Where I live everyone, even the wasters, had to do two or three jobs to survive until the late 1990s. The people who I fear for more are employees in the private sector who have skills that are either non-transferable or basic.
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Wed Oct 15, 2008 10:42 pm

cactus flower wrote:
rockyracoon wrote:
Didn't know where to put this phone conversation I've just had but decided on this thread because it deals with what the young wage-earners do to survive in the modern Irish economy.

Long story - short. Just got off the phone with a yound fella (25-29) who called to ask about nixers (wee side jobs). Told him I'd let him know of any jobs, but his story is kinda of frightening as he just related.

He works full time as a painter but always has a wee extra job of his own to do at night and on the weekends. He told me that he'd bought a new home in 2006 for 185K. Well, his SU bought it. She went out to view a new estate and when he came back from work that evening she'd all but emptied their savings to use as a deposit in case someone else snapped up the property. affraid

He may have to start using his savings at the moment although he's still working full time, as is the SU, but the wee side jobs made all the difference. As he says, he knows people have money but they aren't spending like they used to.

He told me his only consolation is that the property is now worth an additional 100K now. Why is it worth 100K more today? I didn't have the heart to ask. Rolling Eyes

I just wonder has a good proportion of a generation been hampered by this type of thinking? He believes that everything will turn around at the beginning of the new year. I hope he's right. There doesn't seem to be any real thought for the future, and when thinking is directed at the future it's in terms of asset appreciation only. The risk side of the equation just doesn't seem register with many of his cohorts.

Survival of the economic/financial fittest will probably be a more telling factor in the future.

He sounds like a worker and a survivor rockyracoon. Where I live everyone, even the wasters, had to do two or three jobs to survive until the late 1990s. The people who I fear for more are employees in the private sector who have skills that are either non-transferable or basic.
Never mind the lack of basic cop on. Dumbed down is the opposite of wised up and there is a whole dumbed down generation out there. Scary.
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Sun Oct 19, 2008 4:33 pm

manoftruth, Sept. 2007
"...only then will they realise that money cannot be eaten" - Ron Paul and the truth about money
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJxVIbQo3Hc&feature=user

manoftruth, Feb. 2008
Crystal Ball Cottage Industry ... what's going to happen 8 months down the road.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfX4c3jQj5I&feature=user

manoftruth, July 9th, 2008
"The Bear is Back! - but don't panic - it won't be long before he slinks away". Slurp.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQXeZmm27I&feature=user

MOT, Sept. 2008
Time to start a food company.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUE6PUJAShU&feature=user

MOT, 9th of October, 2008
Land of milk and honey .. ?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvhOoYlbubs&feature=user
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PostSubject: Re: Survival of the fittest   Sun Oct 19, 2008 5:38 pm

Auditor #9 wrote:
manoftruth, Sept. 2007
"...only then will they realise that money cannot be eaten" - Ron Paul and the truth about money
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJxVIbQo3Hc&feature=user

manoftruth, Feb. 2008
Crystal Ball Cottage Industry ... what's going to happen 8 months down the road.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfX4c3jQj5I&feature=user

manoftruth, July 9th, 2008
"The Bear is Back! - but don't panic - it won't be long before he slinks away". Slurp.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOQXeZmm27I&feature=user

MOT, Sept. 2008
Time to start a food company.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUE6PUJAShU&feature=user

MOT, 9th of October, 2008
Land of milk and honey .. ?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvhOoYlbubs&feature=user

Watched the first one - hyper money mode should be called hyperinflation mode - just the same as Zimbabwe, with people queuing for their cash and then running to spend if before it devalues. He seems to share my feeling that food is the thing.
What I don't share is his view that the Second Coming is going to sort this out.
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